Tagged: Computer interfaces

The Bilinear Brain: Towards Subject‐Invariant Analysis

A major challenge in single-trial electroencephalography (EEG) analysis and Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI) is the so called, inter-subject/inter-session variability: (i.e large variability in measurements obtained during different recording sessions). This variability restricts the number of samples available for single-trial analysis to a limited number that can be obtained during a single session. Here we propose a novel method that distinguishes between subject-invariant features and subject-specific features, based on a bilinear formulation. The method allows for one to combine multiple recording of EEG to estimate the subject-invariant parameters, hence addressing the issue of inter-subject variability, while reducing the complexity of estimation for the subject-specific parameters. The method is demonstrated on 34 datasets from two different experimental paradigms: Perception categorization task and Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) task. We show significant improvements in classification performance over state-of-the-art methods. Further, our method extracts neurological components never before reported on the RSVP thus demonstrating the ability of our method to extract novel neural signatures from the data.

Spatio-temporal linear discrimination for inferring task difficulty from EEG

We present a spatio-temporal linear discrimination method for single-trial classification of multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG). No prior information about the characteristics of the neural activity is required i.e. the algorithm requires no knowledge about the timing and/or spatial distribution of the evoked responses. The algorithm finds a temporal delay/window onset time for each EEG channel and then spatially integrates the channels for each channel-specific onset time. The algorithm can be seen as learning discrimination trajectories defined within the space of EEG channels. We demonstrate the method for detecting auditory evoked neural activity and discrimination of task difficulty in a complex visual-auditory environment