Tagged: fMRI

Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Reveals a Temporal Cascade of Task-Related and Default-Mode Activations During a Simple Target Detection Task

Focused attention continuously and inevitably fluctuates, and to completely understand the mechanisms responsible for these modulations it is necessary to localize the brain regions involved. During a simple visual oddball task, neural responses measured by electroencephalography (EEG) modulate primarily with attention, but source localization of the correlates is a challenge. In this study we use single-trial analysis of simultaneously-acquired scalp EEG and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data to investigate the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates of modulations in task-related attention, and we unravel the temporal cascade of these transient activations. We hypothesize that activity in brain regions associated with various task-related cognitive processes modulates with attention, and that their involvements occur transiently in a specific order. We analyze the fMRI BOLD signal by first regressing out the variance linked to observed stimulus and behavioral events. We then correlate the residual variance with the trial-to-trial variation of EEG discriminating components for identical stimuli, estimated at a sequence of times during a trial. Post-stimulus and early in the trial, we find activations in right-lateralized frontal regions and lateral occipital cortex, areas that are often linked to task-dependent processes, such as attentional orienting, and decision certainty. After the behavioral response we see correlates in areas often associated with the default-mode network and introspective processing, including precuneus, angular gyri, and posterior cingulate cortex. Our results demonstrate that during simple tasks both task-dependent and default-mode networks are transiently engaged, with a distinct temporal ordering and millisecond timescale.

Single-trial Analysis of Neuroimaging Data: Inferring Neural Networks Underlying Perceptual, Decision Making in the Human Brain

Advances in neural signal and image acquisition as well as in multivariate signal processing and machine learning are enabling a richer and more rigorous understanding of the neural basis of human decision-making. Decision-making is essentially characterized behaviorally by the variability of the decision across individual trials—e.g., error and response time distributions. To infer the neural processes that govern decision-making requires identifying neural correlates of such trial-to-trial behavioral variability. In this paper, we review efforts that utilize signal processing and machine learning to enable single-trial analysis of neural signals acquired while subjects perform simple decision-making tasks. Our focus is on neuroimaging data collected noninvasively via electroencephalograpy (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We review the specific frame-work for extracting decision-relevant neural components from the neuroimaging data, the goal being to analyze the trial-to-trial variability of the neural signal along these component directions and to relate them to elements of the decision-making process. We review results for perceptual decision-making and discrimination tasks, including paradigms in which EEG variability is used to inform an fMRI analysis. We discuss how single-trial analysis reveals aspects of the underlying decision-making networks that are unobservable using traditional trial-averaging methods.